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July 1st. Canada Day:Here are the ways Canada is indisputably better than the United States

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Here are the ways Canada is indisputably better than the United States.Thanks to Donald Trump’s baffling decision to plunge us into a trade war, Canada Day this year will almost certainly feature a higher-than-average rate of passive-aggressive America-bashing.

The United States remains our closest friend and ally, and continues to supply us with all our non-Drake entertainment. Nevertheless, in the spirit of informed jingoism, here is a quick (and obviously biased) guide to the ways in which Canada is indisputably superior to our southern neighbour.

We fought Nazis earlier!
The awesome might and manpower of the United States was instrumental in liberating Western Europe from Nazi domination and shielding it from Soviet conquest. Nevertheless, Canada can take pride that we were killing Nazis while Charles Lindbergh was still hosting isolationist “America First” rallies. The United States not only entered the Second World War late, but retained financial ties with Nazi Germany well into 1941. Even as Hitler steamrolled Europe and laid siege to Great Britain, Germany was getting its movies from Hollywood and building Wehrmacht trucks in Ford Motor Company factories. Frustrated by their country’s neutrality, thousands of Americans would cross the border to join the Canadian military. The RCAF alone recruited around 9,000 Americans before the attack on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into the war. George H.W. Bush, in fact, was seriously considering strapping on a maple leaf to fight the Nazis before Pearl Harbor intervened.

No Civil War!
The United States had only been a country for 87 years (or four score and seven years if you’re being formal) before it was plunged into a horrific civil war. On Canada’s 87th birthday in 1954, by contrast, it hosted a Commonwealth games and invented Yahtzee. Not only has Canada never had a civil war, but it hasn’t even come close. The 1869 Red River Rebellion killed one person. Quebec secessionist terrorism in the 1960s claimed fewer than six people. The biggest armed uprising in Canada’s history was arguably a series of rebellions in 1837 designed to remake British North America as a republic. But the rebellions were small and laughably unsuccessful. In one particularly ignominious example in Toronto, 800 rebels turned and fled after encountering a loyalist force of only 20 riflemen. Also, in a detail that would have flabbergasted Americans of the age, many of the pro-government troops who put down the 1837 rebellions were black.

No slavery!
By the time of Canada’s 1867 founding, the United States was also slavery-free (see “Civil War,” above). While Canadian soil has also hosted plenty of human bondage, be it pre-contact Indigenous slavery or African slavery in colonial times, slavery was nevertheless officially illegal in the lands that would become Canada by 1834 — 31 years before it was the case in the U.S. We also never participated in the particularly brutal and industrialized form of plantation slavery that came to dominate the southern United States. The slave population in British North America was never more than 10,000. In Mississippi on the eve of the Civil War, there were more than 440,000 slaves compared to a free population of only 354,000.

No vicious beatings in our parliament!
One of the darker moments in U.S. legislative history came in 1856, when a South Carolina senator approached Massachusetts’ Charles Sumner in the U.S. Senate chamber and proceeded to cane him to within an inch of his life. Worst still, the incident was only an extreme example of a political culture renowned for its violence. Nineteenth century U.S. federal politicians regularly beat, threatened or pulled guns on their opponents on Capitol Hill. Two-term U.S. president Andrew Jackson participated in more than 100 duels over his lifetime, and later expressed regret that he had not shot the then-Speaker of the House, Henry Clay. Against all this, it’s quite an achievement that one of the most uncivil moments in Canada’s parliament remains the time a Tory called a Liberal a “political sewer pipe.”


No Indian Wars!
Canada has nothing to be smug about when it comes to our history of Indigenous relations. From Indian Residential Schools to forced relocation to the simple act of arresting Indigenous people if they were found off reserve, it’s all pretty ugly. But for every crime against Indigenous people in Canada’s history, U.S. history usually has a worse version. The most obvious example is that the United States spent much of the 19th century engaged in open and often brutal warfare with everyone from Seminoles in Florida to Apache in New Mexico to Sioux in Montana. Canada absolutely did not keep its hands clean settling the west, but it did do it with little to no outright warfare. Major Canadian incidents of settler-Indigenous violence, such as the Chilcotin War or the North-West Rebellion, would barely qualify as footnotes in the massacre-packed history of U.S. expansion. Even at the time, Americans marveled at the apparent Canadian ability to co-exist with Indigenous people without shooting them. Canada had “the same greedy, dominant Anglo-Saxon race, and the same heathen,” wrote the Minnesota Episcopal bishop Henry Whipple in the 1870s. “They have not spent one dollar on Indian wars, they have had no Indian massacres.”

We abolished the penny!
When a Canadian crosses the United States border, they are stepping into a museum of obsolete payment systems. U.S. credit cards still stubbornly refuse to come equipped with microchips, preferring to rely exclusively on easily-defrauded magnetic strips. Banknotes are printed on paper rather than polymer. Most notoriously, Americans still use the penny, a monstrous one cent copper-plated disc worth far less than the metal it contains. And the penny remains in U.S. circulation for the dumbest of reasons: A combination of legislative apathy and aggressive lobbying by the U.S. zinc industry.

No violent founding!
Canada’s peaceful 1867 birth was so easily overlooked that our own head of state forgot to mention it in her diary. The United States, by contrast, came into being atop more than 100,000 dead. These dual histories are all the more notable given that the United States and Canada were both seeking autonomy from the same country: Great Britain. The vast majority of British colonies, in fact, would gain their independence without killing anybody. This makes it all the more unreasonable that the Founding Fathers allowed a tax dispute with London to spiral into a devastating internecine war that sent thousands of families fleeing into Nova Scotia for their live

Thanks to Donald Trump’s baffling decision to plunge us into a trade war, Canada Day this year will almost certainly feature a higher-than-average rate of passive-aggressive America-bashing.

The United States remains our closest friend and ally, and continues to supply us with all our non-Drake entertainment. Nevertheless, in the spirit of informed jingoism, here is a quick (and obviously biased) guide to the ways in which Canada is indisputably superior to our southern neighbour.

We fought Nazis earlier!
The awesome might and manpower of the United States was instrumental in liberating Western Europe from Nazi domination and shielding it from Soviet conquest. Nevertheless, Canada can take pride that we were killing Nazis while Charles Lindbergh was still hosting isolationist “America First” rallies. The United States not only entered the Second World War late, but retained financial ties with Nazi Germany well into 1941. Even as Hitler steamrolled Europe and laid siege to Great Britain, Germany was getting its movies from Hollywood and building Wehrmacht trucks in Ford Motor Company factories. Frustrated by their country’s neutrality, thousands of Americans would cross the border to join the Canadian military. The RCAF alone recruited around 9,000 Americans before the attack on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into the war. George H.W. Bush, in fact, was seriously considering strapping on a maple leaf to fight the Nazis before Pearl Harbor intervened.


Swastikas being paraded through New York City in October, 1939 â one month after Canada had declared war on Germany. U.S. Library of Congress
No Civil War!
The United States had only been a country for 87 years (or four score and seven years if you’re being formal) before it was plunged into a horrific civil war. On Canada’s 87th birthday in 1954, by contrast, it hosted a Commonwealth games and invented Yahtzee. Not only has Canada never had a civil war, but it hasn’t even come close. The 1869 Red River Rebellion killed one person. Quebec secessionist terrorism in the 1960s claimed fewer than six people. The biggest armed uprising in Canada’s history was arguably a series of rebellions in 1837 designed to remake British North America as a republic. But the rebellions were small and laughably unsuccessful. In one particularly ignominious example in Toronto, 800 rebels turned and fled after encountering a loyalist force of only 20 riflemen. Also, in a detail that would have flabbergasted Americans of the age, many of the pro-government troops who put down the 1837 rebellions were black.


A view of the Gettysburg Battlefield. There are much fewer battlefields to visit in Canada. Pixabay
No slavery!
By the time of Canada’s 1867 founding, the United States was also slavery-free (see “Civil War,” above). While Canadian soil has also hosted plenty of human bondage, be it pre-contact Indigenous slavery or African slavery in colonial times, slavery was nevertheless officially illegal in the lands that would become Canada by 1834 — 31 years before it was the case in the U.S. We also never participated in the particularly brutal and industrialized form of plantation slavery that came to dominate the southern United States. The slave population in British North America was never more than 10,000. In Mississippi on the eve of the Civil War, there were more than 440,000 slaves compared to a free population of only 354,000.


Slaves plant sweet potatoes at a South Carolina plantation in the early 1860s. There are no pictures of Canadian slaves, since Canadian slavery was abolished by the time photography was widely available. New York Historical Society
No vicious beatings in our parliament!
One of the darker moments in U.S. legislative history came in 1856, when a South Carolina senator approached Massachusetts’ Charles Sumner in the U.S. Senate chamber and proceeded to cane him to within an inch of his life. Worst still, the incident was only an extreme example of a political culture renowned for its violence. Nineteenth century U.S. federal politicians regularly beat, threatened or pulled guns on their opponents on Capitol Hill. Two-term U.S. president Andrew Jackson participated in more than 100 duels over his lifetime, and later expressed regret that he had not shot the then-Speaker of the House, Henry Clay. Against all this, it’s quite an achievement that one of the most uncivil moments in Canada’s parliament remains the time a Tory called a Liberal a “political sewer pipe.”


No Indian Wars!
Canada has nothing to be smug about when it comes to our history of Indigenous relations. From Indian Residential Schools to forced relocation to the simple act of arresting Indigenous people if they were found off reserve, it’s all pretty ugly. But for every crime against Indigenous people in Canada’s history, U.S. history usually has a worse version. The most obvious example is that the United States spent much of the 19th century engaged in open and often brutal warfare with everyone from Seminoles in Florida to Apache in New Mexico to Sioux in Montana. Canada absolutely did not keep its hands clean settling the west, but it did do it with little to no outright warfare. Major Canadian incidents of settler-Indigenous violence, such as the Chilcotin War or the North-West Rebellion, would barely qualify as footnotes in the massacre-packed history of U.S. expansion. Even at the time, Americans marveled at the apparent Canadian ability to co-exist with Indigenous people without shooting them. Canada had “the same greedy, dominant Anglo-Saxon race, and the same heathen,” wrote the Minnesota Episcopal bishop Henry Whipple in the 1870s. “They have not spent one dollar on Indian wars, they have had no Indian massacres.”


It’s no accident that after his victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Sitting Bull fled north and made friends with a Mountie. File
We abolished the penny!
When a Canadian crosses the United States border, they are stepping into a museum of obsolete payment systems. U.S. credit cards still stubbornly refuse to come equipped with microchips, preferring to rely exclusively on easily-defrauded magnetic strips. Banknotes are printed on paper rather than polymer. Most notoriously, Americans still use the penny, a monstrous one cent copper-plated disc worth far less than the metal it contains. And the penny remains in U.S. circulation for the dumbest of reasons: A combination of legislative apathy and aggressive lobbying by the U.S. zinc industry.


Pictured: A tyranny from which Americans have not freed themselves. Craig Glover/The London Free Press
No violent founding!
Canada’s peaceful 1867 birth was so easily overlooked that our own head of state forgot to mention it in her diary. The United States, by contrast, came into being atop more than 100,000 dead. These dual histories are all the more notable given that the United States and Canada were both seeking autonomy from the same country: Great Britain. The vast majority of British colonies, in fact, would gain their independence without killing anybody. This makes it all the more unreasonable that the Founding Fathers allowed a tax dispute with London to spiral into a devastating internecine war that sent thousands of families fleeing into Nova Scotia for their lives.

We had way less Prohibition!
Alcohol was effectively illegal in the United States from 1920 to 1933. The policy is now regarded as an epic failure, having spawned a dramatic rise in organized crime, political corruption and fatal poisonings. Canada also flirted with Prohibition after the First World War, but was much quicker to realize it was a terrible idea. Quebec, for one, repealed prohibition a mere two years after instituting it. The legal concept of “airspace,” in fact, was invented because the prohibitionist U.S. government objected to Canada constantly flying planeloads of whiskey over “dry” Alaska in order to resupply the Yukon.

We’re not as fat!
To be sure, Canada is still one of the fattest countries in the world. Just ask the thousands of new Canadians who sprout a beer belly almost immediately after swearing an oath to the Queen. Nevertheless, only 20.2 per cent of Canadian adults are obese. This is compared to 39.8 per cent of U.S. adults. This is despite the fact that Canadians similarly live in car-dependent cities, not to mention occupying a far colder country. However, the Great White North also lacks Cheez-Its and White Castle, which arguably means we are less susceptible to caloric temptation.

We aren’t utterly crushed by debt!
The Liberals under Justin Trudeau are the most spendthrift Canadian government in decades. Despite this, we’re still not even close to the utterly meteoric sums being run up by Washington. In the current fiscal year, the Canadian federal government is set to run up a deficit of $19.4 billion — roughly $524 per Canadian. In the U.S., meanwhile, a Republican-dominated Washington is set to rack up a federal deficit of $985 billion next year — or US$3,024 per American (CDN$4,032.40). The disparity gets even starker when comparing our respective national debts. The per-capita share of the Canadian federal debt is $17,800. In the U.S., it’s US$64,564 (CDN$86,057.68).

Our obnoxious reality TV star failed miserably at politics!
It may be hard to remember, but there was once a Canadian reality TV star who knew almost nothing about our political system and had no legislative experience whatsoever. Regardless, he figured he could use his wealth and star power alone to cruise into the prime minister’s office. Not only did Kevin O’Leary not become prime minister, but he withdrew from the Conservative leadership election within four months and continues to nurse $400,000 in campaign debts. To be fair, though, O’Leary’s political ambitions didn’t fall apart because Canadians have a deep-rooted culture of demanding sober, thoughtful and experienced legislators. Rather, it’s because O’Leary can’t speak French.

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   Oh Johnny, what have you done?

   I like Canada. I grew up across the St. Lawrence River from Prescott, Ontario and spent a lot of time there. All of my ancestors and my wife's ancestors are French Canadian. We grew up eating poutine. My grandfather taught me French. We listened to Canadian radio stations. And I've screwed a lot of Canadian women: the drinking age in Canada in the '60s was 21 and in NY State, 18. So Canadians came to my home town of Ogdensburg, NY to drink and when the girls would miss their rides back home, we'd take them home. 

    All that said, I cannot stand by while my country is put down without throwing some national insults right back at ya, to wit...

- For about 8 months of the year you can’t do the simplest of human activites in Canada like going out for a walk, sitting on the patio or on a bench in the park, even opening the window to bring in some fresh air. 

- If you have a health issue that requires long term care, be prepared to wait a long time if you don't die first. Canadians come to the U.S. for long-term care.

- The country is divided and loosely bound together. Quebec doesn’t feel belonging and has never signed the Canadian constitution. 

- The liberal socialist government is literally in every aspect of a Canadian's life from where they go to school to whether they are eating trans-fat in the restaurants. 

- Job creation is weak and jobs are hard to find. Finding a job in Canada is like finding a girlfriend. It is a major life event that all your family and friends will be celebrating with you.

- By and large, Canadians are fat. Like bears, they need to put on weight to suffer the Canadian winters but while bears sleep the winter months away, Canadians drink the winters months away. 

- Shopping online sucks. Nothing is shipped to Canada. Many of international brands and manufacturers won't ship anything to most of Canadian provinces. They are limited to local brands and lower quality brands 

- Computers, electronics, food and gas are expensive. Ridiculous prices everywhere.

- Up to a $3,000 difference for a European car brand manufactured in Michigan. Insurance coverage is very expensive with, basic liability $100/month if you're lucky.

- Malls and stores close at 5 p.m. on weekends.

- There is an absence of famous chains: IHOP, Applebee's, TGI Friday's, Dennys, Taco Bell, etc.

- 12% taxes: provincial plus federal.

- Wages are low: entry level salary for a fresh graduate is ridiculous. Canada is a country with no jobs for new immigrants, regardless of however suitably qualified they are, young or senior. Even the simple blue-collar jobs are hard to find.

- The country does not have a distinct flavor or national identity except in Quebec where they really cherish their language, their history, culture and identity. Otherwise, life in Canada doesn’t really come with a sense of belonging.

- Universities/Education: international students who decide to study Canada are sorry but idiots, if you are going to pay $25k a year for tuition, go to an American university.

-  The country lacks ambition. It doesn’t seek first place economically, technologically, in the military, in politics, arts, education or anything, and it isn’t known or famous for anything special or spectacular except for the CN Tower.

- The bank gives you an Interac card but you can't use it online and can't use it internationally.

- Expensive fees are everywhere: drivers license is $100/year, change of address $120/year, checking account $5/month, ridiculous condo fees.

- Boring cities, nothing to do

- No real industry, etc...

- Nobody goes to Canada for vacation.

HAPPY CANADA DAY, eh?
 

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Harry,I live south of Michigan and I am at the most southern point in Canada, so I get decent weather around here,our area right now is booming.Yes it is expensive to live here.But I like it cause we pay nothing for a stay in a hospital and why are there so many US citizens crossing the border over here (Windsor,ON.) to buy their meds eg: insulin for one.Then I don't like guns.I am also getting treatments for my Cancer and no charges for Dr. visits or my meds. I get dental and eye coverage and also I feel safe and can smoke my weed.We are trying to get booze in the corner stores like you guys.I have cousins that live in Michigan and they were coming to Canada to drink cause our drinking age is lower than Michigan.True our money is worth shit,but it works over here.Anyway Harry like I said we all are proud of our countries.I was at most of our >XI< festivals and found you guys to be friendly and nice people but you have a lot of accents from different parts of the states I noticed,but other than that I have or never had any problems with the guys and ladies in the USA.Don't get mad I saw that article in the newspaper.You'll get your turn on the 4th of July and you can bash my country and I won't get upset.I know we have a faggy Prime Minister.

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@HarryWeezer

I did not take your post serious but I just thought I would answer some of the statements you said. A lot of US citizens have misconceptions of Canada so I thought I might clear some of them up.

For about 8 months of the year you can’t do the simplest of human activites in Canada like going out for a walk, sitting on the patio or on a bench in the park, even opening the window to bring in some fresh air.

Colorado, Utah, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, West Virginia, Missouri, Kansas, Delaware, Nebraska, New Jersey, Pensylvania, Vermont, Rhode Island, New York, Connecticut, Washington, Oregon, Indiana, New Hampshire, Ohio, Illinois, Wyoming, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, Idaho, Wisconsin, South Dakota, North Dakota, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota and Alaska are all States that have winters. Do their winters all last 8 months a year?

I live in Southern Ontario about 20 minutes from Niagara Falls. If we do get snow, it starts in December and ends in March. Most of our snow melts in a couple days.

I can go for walks every day all year round. I do open my windows during winter to air out my house. I can sit on my patio and a bench all winter long.

If you have a health issue that requires long term care, be prepared to wait a long time if you don't die first. Canadians come to the U.S. for long-term care.

We Canadian's do not wait long if it is life threatening. We do not come to the US for long term care, we come there if there are no doctors that specialize in the disease that we may have.

At least for the most part we do not have to pay for our medical unlike the US who charge insane amounts all in the name of greed, right?

The country is divided and loosely bound together. Quebec doesn’t feel belonging and has never signed the Canadian constitution.

And we care about that, why? Quebec has always had an issue with the rest of Canada. Most of them think their shit doesn't stink. They are the most ignorant people in most cases. Kind of arrogant. Jeez that reminds me of the US. Maybe the US will allow them to join as a state lol they will fit in just nicely. LOL

The liberal socialist government is literally in every aspect of a Canadian's life from where they go to school to whether they are eating trans-fat in the restaurants.

LOL And the US gov't controls it's people 24/7.

Job creation is weak and jobs are hard to find. Finding a job in Canada is like finding a girlfriend. It is a major life event that all your family and friends will be celebrating with you.

LOL How many US citizens are out of work right now? Because of your presidents tariffs how many more are going to be out of work? How many US citizens have lost everything due to your gov't starting wars based on lies?

By and large, Canadians are fat. Like bears, they need to put on weight to suffer the Canadian winters but while bears sleep the winter months away, Canadians drink the winters months away.

There are way way more fat Americans. Americans do not drink in winter or all year round? LOL

Shopping online sucks. Nothing is shipped to Canada. Many of international brands and manufacturers won't ship anything to most of Canadian provinces. They are limited to local brands and lower quality brands

I get US shit like Reebok, Nike, and name brand items delivered all the time.

Computers, electronics, food and gas are expensive. Ridiculous prices everywhere.

You can blame that on the US. They charge out the nose for everything.

Up to a $3,000 difference for a European car brand manufactured in Michigan. Insurance coverage is very expensive with, basic liability $100/month if you're lucky.

That is world wide. A lot of that is due to trumps tariff charges that raised the cost of steel which raised the cost of cars and anything made from it. Insurance companies are just plain greedy and will charge anything to make a buck. I was paying $28 a month for full coverage and now it's $99 because they said it's due to all these young punks claiming monthly because they drive like idiots.

Malls and stores close at 5 p.m. on weekends.

Ours all close at 9pm some at 10pm and food (take out at midnight) (fri-sat 2am). 7 days a week.

There is an absence of famous chains: IHOP, Applebee's, TGI Friday's, Dennys, Taco Bell, etc.

We do have the shitty taco bell but since we are a different country of course we have are own trade mark stores. Some are good, some not so much but that is the same as every country, right?

12% taxes: provincial plus federal.

It's actually 13%. Our cost of living is higher than the US.

Wages are low: entry level salary for a fresh graduate is ridiculous. Canada is a country with no jobs for new immigrants, regardless of however suitably qualified they are, young or senior. Even the simple blue-collar jobs are hard to find.

All of Canada's minimum wage is $14 per hour. If you think $20 per hour starting rate for a graduate is ridiculous then so be it. My city has been taken over by immigrants. The trucking industry where companies have been established for years are now closed due to these people low balling them. They put 2-5 drivers in each truck so the truck never stops. They drive like mad men and cause so many accidents that they have to change the cvor number 2-3 times a year. They have taken over the food take out restaurants. I stopped ordering because they can't speak proper english and it was taking over 20 minutes to place an order so I just hung up and said fuck this. They will not hire anyone who is not of their kind. They actually took over an entire city not far from me. So, yes, it is hard for people to find work largely because of that.

The country does not have a distinct flavor or national identity except in Quebec where they really cherish their language, their history, culture and identity. Otherwise, life in Canada doesn’t really come with a sense of belonging.

That is so not true.

Universities/Education: international students who decide to study Canada are sorry but idiots, if you are going to pay $25k a year for tuition, go to an American university.

Like I said our cost of living is higher here. We have student loans here that can also be utilized by international students. The best part is if they have 90% or more as an average grade the student loans turn into government grants and the loan disappears. They get their education for free. Guess Canada is not so bad after all, right?

The country lacks ambition. It doesn’t seek first place economically, technologically, in the military, in politics, arts, education or anything, and it isn’t known or famous for anything special or spectacular except for the CN Tower.

Hmm. Ask all the engineers who design and build your military jets. They are mostly Canadian. Where does the US land their military jets when there is a computer problem? In Nova Scotia, Canada. I know this because a friend of mine works there and that is his job. I did like the pic he sent me once of fully loaded F18 with missiles sitting on the runway in front of his office window.

The bank gives you an Interac card but you can't use it online and can't use it internationally.

The banks give us Interac Visa Debit cards. We can use them online and interternationally. They act just like a visa credit card.

Expensive fees are everywhere: drivers license is $100/year, change of address $120/year, checking account $5/month, ridiculous condo fees.

Drivers license is $75 every 5 years. Change of address is free. Chequing account fee differ depending on what your asking for. Condo fees are included the price you pay for rent. If you have a mortgage you pay separately but they are not outrages.

Boring cities, nothing to do

Your labeling an entire country on this? LOL

No real industry, etc...

That is not true. We have a lot of industries here.

Nobody goes to Canada for vacation.

That is not true. We have a shit load of tourists here.

 

HAPPY CANADA DAY, eh?

YES, WE CANADIANS WILL HAVE A GREAT CANADA DAY!!!

 

MIC DROP NOW.... [email protected] LOL

 

 

Edited by Angelz

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We in the UK, having previously owned both pieces of real estate can offer a 'neighbour dispute service' if you wish?  completely impartial (dependent upon quick payment), advice freely given, and you know you can trust us, ring Rob for bank details.

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Trudeau letting in 500,000 refugees , debt that keeps rising each year since he has been in office. He was quoted as saying the debt will basically sort itself out

Food prices one of the highest for a bit of meat and house prices insanely high

No thanks

Sorry Johnny but your country needs Trudeau out fast 😕

 

Edited by Barron3000

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12 hours ago, JohnnyDos said:

We fought Nazis earlier!
The awesome might and manpower of the United States was instrumental in liberating Western Europe from Nazi domination and shielding it from Soviet conquest. Nevertheless, Canada can take pride that we were killing Nazis while Charles Lindbergh was still hosting isolationist “America First” rallies. The United States not only entered the Second World War late, but retained financial ties with Nazi Germany well into 1941. Even as Hitler steamrolled Europe and laid siege to Great Britain, Germany was getting its movies from Hollywood and building Wehrmacht trucks in Ford Motor Company factories. Frustrated by their country’s neutrality, thousands of Americans would cross the border to join the Canadian military. The RCAF alone recruited around 9,000 Americans before the attack on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into the war. George H.W. Bush, in fact, was seriously considering strapping on a maple leaf to fight the Nazis before Pearl Harbor intervened.

WWII - As a American Historian I have found that what is written every where in this world is written towards the reader and their location...I myself was born and raised in a small city of 35k and with in the confines of that city was very huge industial complexes that help end all wars up to WWII and Supplied Canada the means to enter early.... I can a test through my own family and that city that we as Americans were secretly in WWII in the very early days of the war by producing supplies and smuggling them to Europe (my grandfather born 1898) in the late 30,s sailed on the "MS East Indian"...In fact even til this day the wolds largest shipyard ever was there...The model M1917 was massed produced there and would serve in WWI and WWII as well because of the M1 Grand shortages and later in Korea....The anchor for the USS Arizona was made there as was most of all others...My Grandfather served in 3 Wars as a Engineer and as WWII came in full swing he would do only Sea trials to keep them going out...His last travel passport had him being pulled from the MS East Indian on 4 /4/1942 and Uboat U-181 would sink her on 11/3/1942 off of  the Cape of Good Hope Africa with a cargo of 3500 tons of manganese ore / 500 tons of tea and 560 tons of "general cargo".... "That City" - Chester Pennsylvania was named so by William Penn in 1682 and is the Resting place of John Morton who is buried at the Old Swedes Cemetery and was one of the founding Fathers of the United States (a signer)...  The worlds first and only ocean crossing ship built entirely by black folks was the SS Marine Eagle and it was built there in the #4 yard....She was built with 6200 workers and launched 5/1943 by March 1945, Yard 4 would go on to launch fifteen ships and thirty-five car floats.....Johnny that my friend is a City of a mere 6 square miles/15.6 km imagine all the others here in America....Love ya my friend ! God Bless Canada

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Loves the canada and the usa all lol

Faire table rase du passé et battis l avenir , ce souvenir de ce que nos pays ont fait de bien ou de mal pour construire l avenir . L univers est tellement grand que nous ne savons même pas si il a une fin ... Alors qu attendons nous pour nous unir et nous lancé dans l aventure ?? L humain est t il trop con ? lol

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